hitrecordjoe:

I got to go to Tumblr’s REBLOG THIS FILM FESTIVAL tonight.  It was such a great time!
I hope our movie-going culture heads further in this direction.  In today’s contemporary night at the movies, we usually go to some sterile and styleless multiplex, sit among people whom we wish weren’t there, watch about a half hour of advertisement and then watch a movie to which we’re connected only through commercials we’ve seen on TV.  But tonight, I went to a fantastic cinema/venue, called CINESPACE, that I’ve been meaning to check out forever but only finally doing so now; it’s not rows and rows of people ignoring each other, but instead tables and chairs, a bar, a social environment, where the people and setting enhance the movie-watching experience instead of detracting from it.  There were no commercials.  And the short films we watched were made by people from a community to which everyone felt connected.
And I mean it when I say the short films were really good.  They showed one that Rian Johnson and RonenV and I made together out of a random page from Finnegan’s Wake.  It’s called Page 439.  There were a bunch of other cool ones.  The one that sticks out most in my mind, sadly I can’t remember the title, so I can’t find it to link it, but it was about a boy who had a television for a head.  What was that one called?  I want to watch it again…
Anyway, it was a grand success of an evening, and I just wanted to say thanks and bravo to the folks at tumblr who put it all together.
photo by burningdan: “The tumblr(.com) film Fesival had huge tubs of popcorn. Go tumblr!”

hitrecordjoe:

I got to go to Tumblr’s REBLOG THIS FILM FESTIVAL tonight.  It was such a great time!

I hope our movie-going culture heads further in this direction.  In today’s contemporary night at the movies, we usually go to some sterile and styleless multiplex, sit among people whom we wish weren’t there, watch about a half hour of advertisement and then watch a movie to which we’re connected only through commercials we’ve seen on TV.  But tonight, I went to a fantastic cinema/venue, called CINESPACE, that I’ve been meaning to check out forever but only finally doing so now; it’s not rows and rows of people ignoring each other, but instead tables and chairs, a bar, a social environment, where the people and setting enhance the movie-watching experience instead of detracting from it.  There were no commercials.  And the short films we watched were made by people from a community to which everyone felt connected.

And I mean it when I say the short films were really good.  They showed one that Rian Johnson and RonenV and I made together out of a random page from Finnegan’s Wake.  It’s called Page 439.  There were a bunch of other cool ones.  The one that sticks out most in my mind, sadly I can’t remember the title, so I can’t find it to link it, but it was about a boy who had a television for a head.  What was that one called?  I want to watch it again…

Anyway, it was a grand success of an evening, and I just wanted to say thanks and bravo to the folks at tumblr who put it all together.

photo by burningdan: “The tumblr(.com) film Fesival had huge tubs of popcorn. Go tumblr!”

maitresse:

Yes, that is Susan Sontag in a bear suit.
Photo by Annie Leibovitz. Found here.

maitresse:

Yes, that is Susan Sontag in a bear suit.

Photo by Annie Leibovitz. Found here.

(Source: laurenelkin)

http://staff.tumblr.com/post/7615038792/photoset-redux

staff:

Clark went on a harrowing bulldog walk last weekend that lasted nearly 30 minutes and spanned fifteen blocks!

Some moments deserve more than one angle. That’s why we’re ecstatic to give Photosets a huge upgrade today, giving you new levels of control to tell your stories the way you want to.

1) Photoset photos now open in all their high-res glory on the Dashboard and on your blog.

2) You can now pick a layout for your photos to tell the right story.

3) Tumblr Themes can now make Photosets look and work any way you please with a host of new theme variables:

{block:Photoset}
    <!-- Number of photos -->
    {PhotoCount}
    
    <!-- Integer representation of the layout -->
    {PhotosetLayout}
    
    <!-- JS array of the Photoset column counts -->
    {JSPhotosetLayout}
    
    <!-- Each of the Photoset photos -->
    {block:Photos}
        {PhotoURL-500}
        
        {block:HighRes}
            {PhotoURL-HighRes}
        {/block:HighRes}
        
        {Caption}
        
        {block:Exif} ... {/block:Exif}
    {/block:Photos}
{/block:Photoset}

Enjoy!

(Source: david)

You Look Nice Today: East Arcadia State: 2009 MindSetter Sheet

East Arcadia State University Welcomes You!

At the dawn of each academic year, East Arcadia State University prepares our instructors and staff by curating some facts and observations about the generational differences that are peculiar to our incoming freshman class. By understanding how the world looks to them, we hope to…

Perishable Press: Import Feeds to Facebook

Seems like a lot of misinformation and confusion out there on how to import and display your feeds on Facebook. Here is what worked for me:

1. In the lower left-hand corner of your Facebook account, click on “Applications” > “Notes”.

2. In the upper mid-right column, click on “Import a blog” in…

Note: I’ve moved all my HTML5 articles to http://oli.jp/, so I can walk the walk. I’ll leave this here for posterity, but won’t update it.
→ Go to:
“HTML5 structure—HTML4 and XHTML1 to HTML5” on oli.jp We’ve covered a lot of ground so far. To recap, HTML5 has several new block-level sectioning elements that we can use to give relevant parts of web pages more semantic meaning. These new elements are for ‘chunks of related content’—basically a logical section of the document: New sectioning elements in a nutshell <section>—a chunk of related content
<article>—an independent, self-contained chunk of related content, that still makes sense on it’s own (eg in an RSS feed)
<aside>—a chunk of content that is tangentially related to the content that surrounds it, but isn’t essential to understanding that content
<nav>—navigation for the site or page
(cf. <div>—a chunk of content with no additional semantics, eg for CSS styling hooks)
With very few exceptions (generally in web applications) these new sectioning elements should have a title, possibly in a <header> element with any other introductory information. We can use this as a rule of thumb for deciding between <section> and <div>: consciously add a title for each <section>, even if you then hide the title with CSS (as is generally the case with nav for accessibility). If it seems like content that shouldn’t have a title when CSS is disabled, then it’s most probably not a <section> (HTML5Doctor; The Section Element) The new sectioning elements can also contain one or more <footer> elements with additional information, such as author (<address>) or copyright (<small>) info, related links etc. It’s important to note that <header> and <footer> (& <address>) apply to the sectioning element they’re in (this is <body> for a page header or footer). <header> and <footer> can’t contain other <header>s and <footer>s. Finally, while the words “header”, “footer” and “aside” all come with preconceptions, their semantic meaning comes from the types of content they contain, not from their presentation or relative placement. For example, <aside> could contain a footnote, and a <footer> containing a ‘Top of Page’ link could appear at both the top and bottom of a section. Now let’s look at example structures for a basic article page; using the standard layout of a page header (with logo etc), navigation tabs, a main column, a side column, and a page footer. Article PageConverting a simple page to HTML 5# Here’s the outline of the parts of our page: Page header (site name, logo, search…)
Main navigation
Main content (wrapper)
Article (main column)
Article title
Article metadata
Article content…
Article footer Sidebar
Sidebar title
Sidebar content… Page Footer So let’s write that in standard POSH HTML4: <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN” “http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd”>
<html lang=”en”> <head> <title>Article (HTML4)</title> <meta http-equiv=”Content-Type” content=”text/html; charset=utf-8”> </head> <body> <div id=”branding”> <h1>Site name</h1> <!— other page heading content —> </div> <ul id=”nav”> <li>Site navigation</li> </ul> <div id=”content”> <div id=”main”> <!— main content (the article) —> <h1>Article title</h1> <p class=”meta”>Article metadata</p> <p>Article content…</p> <p class=”article-footer”>Article footer</p> </div> <div id=”sidebar”> <!— secondary content —> <h2>Sidebar title</h2> <p>Sidebar content…</p> </div> </div> <div id=”footer”>Footer</div> </body>
</html> So let’s write that in standard POSH XHTML1.0: <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN” “http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd”>
<html lang=”en” xml:lang=”en”> <head> <title>Article (XHTML1)</title> <meta http-equiv=”Content-Type” content=”text/html; charset=utf-8” /> </head> <body> <div id=”branding”> <h1>Site name</h1> <!— other page heading content —> </div> <ul id=”nav”> <li>Site navigation</li> </ul> <div id=”content”> <div id=”main”> <!— main content (the article) —> <h1>Article title</h1> <p class=”meta”>Article metadata</p> <p>Article content…</p> <p class=”article-footer”>Article footer</p> </div> <div id=”sidebar”> <!— secondary content —> <h2>Sidebar title</h2> <p>Sidebar content…</p> </div> </div> <div id=”footer”>Footer</div> </body>
</html> Now let’s convert that to HTML5, using the new structural elements: <!— ‘HTML-style’ HTML5 —>
<!DOCTYPE html><html lang=”en”> <head> <meta charset=”utf-8”><title>Article (HTML5)</title> </head> <body> <header id=”branding”><!— page header (not in section etc) —> <h1>Site name</h1> <!— other page heading content —> </header><nav><ul> <li>Main navigation</li> </ul> </nav><div id=”content”> <!— wrapper for CSS styling & no title so not section —> <article><!— main content (the article) —> <header><h1>Article title</h1> <p>Article metadata</p> </header><p>Article content…</p> <footer>Article footer</footer></article><aside id=”sidebar”><!— secondary content for page (not related to article) —> <h1>Sidebar title</h1> <!— ref: HTML5-style heading element levels —> <p>Sidebar content</p> </aside></div> <footer id=”footer”>Footer</footer><!— page footer (not in section etc) —> </body>
</html> <!— ‘XHTML-style’ HTML5 —>
<!DOCTYPE html><html lang=”en”> <head> <meta charset=”utf-8” /><title>Article (HTML5)</title> </head> <body> <header id=”branding”><!— page header (not in section etc) —> <h1>Site name</h1> <!— other page heading content —> </header><nav><ul> <li>Main navigation</li> </ul> </nav><div id=”content”> <!— wrapper for CSS styling & no title so not section —> <article><!— main content (the article) —> <header><h1>Article title</h1> <p>Article metadata</p> </header><p>Article content…</p> <footer>Article footer</footer></article><aside id=”sidebar”><!— secondary content for page (not related to article) —> <h1>Sidebar title</h1> <!— ref: HTML5-style heading element levels —> <p>Sidebar content</p> </aside></div> <footer id=”footer”>Footer</footer><!— page footer (not in section etc) —> </body>
</html> Note here we assume that the sidebar contains content not related to the article (such as recent articles etc), so it’s a descendent of <body> (page sidebar) not <article>. If it only contained content tangentially related to the article we could use <aside>make <aside> a child of <article>. Also we assume that the <footer> doesn’t contain much more than a copyright statement and contact information—a detailed footer with headings etcpage header and footer don’t contain nested <header> or <footer> elements—a complex page header/footer requiring these would need it’s own <section>. doctype, charset & XHTML-style markup#
You’ll notice the doctype and charset are both much simpler. HTML5 is case-insensitive, but WhatWG recommend this style of doctype as it will also work in XHTML (which is case sensitive). While this style charset is recommended, the pre-HTML5 charset declarations are still valid. Also, if you’re viewing XHTML-style code examples (there’s a handy HTML/XHTML code style switcher top right), you’ll note that the charset element still has an XHTML-style trailing slash in the HTML5 example. In fact XHTML-style markup (a closing / on empty elements) like this is also valid HTML5! This makes it very easy to migrate to HTML5 from both HTML and XHTML pages. You should try to avoid mixing HTML and XHTML-style code, however—choose one style and stick with it. HTML5 or XHTML5? Choose HTML5# If you currently use XHTML1.x you might be thinking to use XHTML5, the XML-compatible version of HTML5. If your website will have a general audience (=people using IE), don’t. XHTML5 must be sent with an XML mime type (like application/xhtml+xml), and even IE8 still doesn’t support this. However, all of the hallmarks of XHTML coding—writing elements in lower case, correct nesting, closing tags, adding optional elements that add meaning—are all compatible (HTML5 is case-insensitive) or encouraged in HTML5. Browser support (via CSS and JS)# So, does it work? Currently the HTML5 structural elements will work in modern browsers (Firefox 3+, Safari 3+, Opera 9+, Chrome 1+) as long as we declare them as block-level elements via this CSS: /* Declaring HTML5 elements */
article,aside,details,figcaption,figure,footer,header,hgroup,menu,nav,section,summary{ display: block; } and in Internet Explorer 8 and below we need to hack support in via Javascript (I bet you didn’t see that coming ;-) (function(){if(!/*@cc_on!@*/0)return;var e = “abbr,article,aside,audio,canvas,details,figcaption,figure,footer,header,hgroup,mark,menu,meter,nav,output,progress,section,summary,time,video”.split(‘,’),i=e.length;while(i—){document.createElement(e[i])}})() The recommended way to add this Javascript is via Remy Sharp’s Google Code-hosted HTLM5 shiv for IE in the page <head>: <!—[if IE lt 9]>
<script src=”http://html5shiv.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/html5.js”></script>
<![endif]—> So, all together now… <head> <!—[if IE lt 9]> <script src=”http://html5shiv.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/html5.js”></script> <![endif]—> <style type=”text/css” media=”screen”> /* Declaring HTML5 elements */ article,aside,details,figcaption,figure,footer,header,hgroup,menu,nav,section,summary{ display: block; } </style> …
</head> …but IE requiring JS means we’re screwed, right?# You can easily choose to not worry about IE with Javascript turned off on a personal weblog, but if an IE user has JS disabled the new elements (and their associated styling) will be dropped, and the page will ass-plode (feel that déjà vu). While Javascript is becoming more of a requirement with the rise of web apps, IE needing Javascript will probably still be a show-stopper on commercial projects. You might think that IE’s lack of support without Javascript for these new elements means you can’t use HTML5 at all, but there are two ways we can still benefit from HTML5’s greater semantic richness—by using HTML5 semantic element names as class names on <div> (so-called HTML4.5), in either HTML4/XHTML1.0 or HTML5. You’re probably already using a standard set of class and id names anyway, and this is in effect a standardised set of semantic class names. HTML5 is basically a superset of HTML4/XHTML1, so as long as you don’t use any new elements HTML5 pages will work in IE. It also has the benefits of simplifying a future move to HTML5, and if you use the HTML5 doctype you can also use the more detailed HTML5 validators. Adding HTML5’s semantics via <div class=”“># Here’s the HTML4 version using HTML5 class names: <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN” “http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd”>
<html lang=”en”> <head> <title>Article (HTML4), with HTML5 class names</title> <meta http-equiv=”Content-Type” content=”text/html; charset=utf-8”> </head> <body> <div id=”page-header” class=”header”> <!— page header (note class=”header”) —> <h1>Site name</h1> <!— other page heading content —> </div> <ul id=”main-nav” class=”nav”> <li>Site navigation</li> </ul> <div id=”content”> <div id=”main” class=”article”> <!— main content —> <div class=”header”> <h1>Article title</h1> <p>Article metadata</p> </div> <p>Article content…</p> <p class=”footer”>Article footer</p> </div> <div id=”sidebar” class=”aside”> <!— secondary content —> <h2>Sidebar title</h2> <p>Sidebar content…</p> </div> </div> <div id=”page-footer” class=”footer”>Footer</div> </body>
</html> Here’s the XHTML1 version using HTML5 class names: <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN” “http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd”>
<html lang=”en” xml:lang=”en”> <head> <title>Article (XHTML1), with HTML5 class names</title> <meta http-equiv=”Content-Type” content=”text/html; charset=utf-8” /> </head> <body> <div id=”page-header” class=”header”> <!— page header —> <h1>Site name</h1> <!— other page heading content —> </div> <ul id=”main-nav” class=”nav”> <li>Site navigation</li> </ul> <div id=”content”> <div id=”main” class=”article”> <!— main content —> <div class=”header”> <h1>Article title</h1> <p>Article metadata</p> </div> <p>Article content…</p> <p class=”footer”>Article footer</p> </div> <div id=”sidebar” class=”aside”> <!— secondary content —> <h2>Sidebar title</h2> <p>Sidebar content…</p> </div> </div> <div id=”page-footer” class=”footer”>Footer</div> </body>
</html> Now in HTML5, again using <div> with HTML5 class names rather than the new HTML5 elements: <!— ‘HTML-style’ HTML5 —>
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang=”en”> <head> <title>Article (HTML5), with HTML5 class names</title> <meta charset=”utf-8”> </head> <body> <div id=”page-header” class=”header”> <!— page header —> <h1>Site name</h1> <!— other page heading content —> </div> <ul id=”main-nav” class=”nav”> <li>Site navigation</li> </ul> <div id=”content”> <div id=”main” class=”article”> <!— main content —> <div class=”header”> <h1>Article title</h1> <p>Article metadata</p> </div> <p>Article content…</p> <p class=”footer”>Article footer</p> </div> <div id=”sidebar” class=”aside”> <!— secondary content —> <h2>Sidebar title</h2> <p>Sidebar content…</p> </div> </div> <div id=”page-footer” class=”footer”>Footer</div> </body>
</html> <!— ‘XHTML-style’ HTML5 —>
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang=”en”> <head> <title>Article (HTML5), with HTML5 class names</title> <meta charset=”utf-8” /> </head> <body> <div id=”page-header” class=”header”> <!— page header —> <h1>Site name</h1> <!— other page heading content —> </div> <ul id=”main-nav” class=”nav”> <li>Site navigation</li> </ul> <div id=”content”> <div id=”main” class=”article”> <!— main content —> <div class=”header”> <h1>Article title</h1> <p>Article metadata</p> </div> <p>Article content…</p> <p class=”footer”>Article footer</p> </div> <div id=”sidebar” class=”aside”> <!— secondary content —> <h2>Sidebar title</h2> <p>Sidebar content…</p> </div> </div> <div id=”page-footer” class=”footer”>Footer</div> </body>
</html> You may be wondering why these two examples are so similar—after all, only the doctype and charset differ! That’s because one of HTML5’s core principles is compatibility. If we don’t use any new HTML5 elements, a change of doctype might be all that’s required to convert a well-coded HTML or XHTML page to HTML5. Why bother with HTML5?# So if you’re not going to use HTML5’s new elements, which IE doesn’t support without JavascriptHopefully by now you’re feeling excited about using HTML5 for a personal project. But if you’ve decided not to use HTML5’s new elements because IE doesn’t support them without Javascript, what’s the point of thinking about HTML5 now? I see several benefits: Thinking about HTML5’s structural elements (even if we only express the semantics via class names as described above) will make our code more logical and semantic
HTML5 is defined in far greater detail than previous HTML/XHTML specs, giving us more guidance in creating web pages
Another benefit of this detail is more accurate validators (W3C, Validator.nu), with the potential for more detailed error messages
If you think you might convert to HTML5 in the future, the HTML-5-elements-as-class-names approach should remove a lot of the pain of converting (especially with a little regexp magic)
Now that XHTML2 development will be halted, starting to learn about the official future of HTML is a Good Idea™
Using HTML5 is a sliding scale, not all or nothing. You can get benefits from simply changing the doctype, a five second job.
Because browsers use the same parser for HTML5 as HTML4/XHTML1, and because backwards compatibility is a central tenet, using an HTML5 doctype today has almost no disadvantages (make sure to check HTML5 differences from HTML4, specifically 3.3-3.5).
It’s possible to just change the doctype and get some benefits from having converted to HTML5 (when you use a validator :). However, the more time you put into HTML5 the greater the reward. You’ll get the most benefit from rethinking your site’s semantics from an HTML5 perspective, although for the present I’d recommend adding these extra semantics via the HTML-5-elements-as-class-names approach for commercial projects. Questions? Feedback? Mistakes? Let me know via Twitter (@boblet)… Changes:# 2009-07-16 Added notes about doctype, XHTML5 and XHTML-style coding in HTML5, thanks to feedback from @robertdot. Also changed doctype to lower case in HTML5 code examples for consistency (HTML5 is case-insensitive so either is fine).
2009-07-19 Added headings for the doctype, charset & XHTML-style markup and HTML5 or XHTML5? Choose HTML5 sections I added last time, for better scanability. Added more info on the HTML5 shiv plus a copy-paste-able head code block for adding JS and CSS (thanks to HTML5 Doctor for the prompt). Also I added a few more links, a couple more points to “Why bother with HTML5?” (‘sliding scale’ and ‘no disadvantages’), rewrote the conclusion, and added what could be my favourite header ever.
2009-07-22 Added or rewrote these subtitles; Converting a simple page to HTML5 and Adding HTML5’s semantics via <div class=”“>. Changed “HTML5” to “HTML 5” etc.
2009-07-22 Reverted doctype to WhatWG-recommended XHTML-compatible style (although a lower-case doctype is fine in HTML 5!).
2009-09-16 Changed almost everything :)
2010-02-07 Updated the browser support section IE Javascript shiv, to add <figcaption> and <summary>, and remove datalist, eventsource, and three even older elements marked with <del> that were included when copying this text in some browsers. Also updated the CSS shiv with <figcaption> and <summary>.
Tumblr Staff: A large segment of custom domain blogs experienced an outage earlier...

staff:

A large segment of custom domain blogs experienced an outage earlier this afternoon with roughly 3.5 hours of intermittent availability.

The interruption stemmed from an issue in the way this blog traffic gets load balanced (distributed across our servers). This system has been undergoing a…

feltron:

Mousepaths on my computer for the last 24 hours.
Made with Anatoly Zenkov’s MousePath application IOGraph

feltron:

Mousepaths on my computer for the last 24 hours.

Made with Anatoly Zenkov’s MousePath application IOGraph

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